Announcement

Version 1.5 now published (16th October 2019).

Dear Settlers community,

version v1.5 of my fight optimiser α-Orionis Centurion has been published here on the 16th October 2019 (Download page). The next version will be 1.6 and is scheduled for mid December 2019.

You can take a sneak preview with some screen shots here or look at the past/future of Centurion.

Some highlights of the optimizer’s features:

  • Optimization of single and multi-wave attacks
  • Optimization of locks and multiple camps per attack
  • Optimization of “smart locks” that will supercede so-called vario locks
  • The database comprises: all generals (incl. General Boris, Mary Christmas, the Medical Field General, the Mad Scientist, and the Older Gemini General), all relevant adventures, including the mountain clan, the 3 Halloween adventures and the new Split City adventure. All opponents’ troops.
  • Configurability by the user regarding loss and skilled generals (all fight-relevant skills)
  • Store results in Adventure Plans to save them and load/refine later and create agendas to support you while playing adventures.

Some things the optimizer won’t be able to do:

  • PvP

More details:

  • Windows application. No web site, not internet access required
  • Command line– and GUI modes.
  • Batch-Mode to optimize entire adventures or other bulks in one go, e.g. over night
  • Programmed in C#. Installation of the .NET Framework may be necessary. Will be delivered along with Centurion.

If you’re interested in becoming a beta tester, go to the download page and fetch the version from there. Or send me an email or contact me in the game.

Thanks in advance and happy settling! Your feedback will always be welcome. You can actually determine the future development of Centurion by being an active beta tester.

Alpha Ori, German world of Steppenwald or on TSO Testing
web: https://AlphaOrionisCenturion.wordpress.com/
mail:
AlphaOrionisTSO@outlook.com

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4 thoughts on “Announcement”

  1. Looks interesting! I have sent you an email. But I did want to ask. You call it an “optimizer” rather than a sim. Does that mean your algorithms use probability calculations from first principles, rather than running lots of simulations to get an estimate?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No, Centurion has a built-in simulator in the ordinary sense. It is exposed to the user via a dedicated simulation mode, so you can do simulations but the strong suit of Centurion is the optimiser. While a simulator answers the question “If I attack this camp with the following configuration, what’s going top happen?”, the optimiser answers the question “How should I attack this camp to be optimal in some sense (e.g. lose as few troops as possible or have a fight that lasts as long as possible…)?” The optimisation algorithm relies on simulation results when comparing the quality of two attack configurations against each other.

      A first principle approach is definitely a smart idea, it has the potential to bring down calculation times drastically. I have discarded the idea so far because of the complexity of the TSO fighting system (order of troops attacking, defending. Splash damage. Chance. All these things.) Of course Centurion covers all this complexity with its simulator-based optimisation approach.

      Like

  2. Is there a worst case option. Most of the time I want to know the worst case, rather than the average case. This would just be one run through the simulator, with me failing and then passing all their accuracy rolls.

    Like

    1. The real worst case (e.g. opponents always hit with the strongest value, own troops always hit with the weakest value) leads to terrible results and terrible losses you’d never want to play. I had this info in Centurion, but I removed it because it is useless. Instead, Centurion gives ranges for almost all values such as for the losses that come from the amount of simulations run underneath the optimiser. The results that I play in the actual game always fall into these boundaries. How many simulation iterations you want to run for every attack configuration is your choice when you start an optimisation job in Centurion. The more iterations you have, the broader your resulting boundaries are going to be. I use 1,000x as a standard. For critical locks I go up to 5,000x or even 10,000x and it’s always been okay.

      Like

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